Review: The Bride Test (The Kiss Quotient #2) by Helen Hoang

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Synopsis from Goodreads:

Khai Diep has no feelings. Well, he feels irritation when people move his things or contentment when ledgers balance down to the penny, but not big, important emotions—like grief. And love. He thinks he’s defective. His family knows better—that his autism means he just processes emotions differently. When he steadfastly avoids relationships, his mother takes matters into her own hands and returns to Vietnam to find him the perfect bride.

As a mixed-race girl living in the slums of Ho Chi Minh City, Esme Tran has always felt out of place. When the opportunity arises to come to America and meet a potential husband, she can’t turn it down, thinking this could be the break her family needs. Seducing Khai, however, doesn’t go as planned. Esme’s lessons in love seem to be working…but only on herself. She’s hopelessly smitten with a man who’s convinced he can never return her affection.

With Esme’s time in the United States dwindling, Khai is forced to understand he’s been wrong all along. And there’s more than one way to love.

I received a copy of this title via NetGalley. It does not impact my review. 

I really wanted to like this book a little more than I did. There was a lot to like about it, but overall it ended up just being ok for me.

What I Liked

  • Learning a little bit about Vietnamese culture. I would’ve liked to have seen a lot more, honestly, but I thought it added a different dimension to the story than a lot of other “arranged marriage” type books I’ve read and I liked that.
  • I LOVED the relationship between Khai and his brother Quan. It made the whole book for me. Quan was so understanding and protective and patient with Khai, but he also didn’t treat him with kid gloves, either. I just loved pretty much every scene that had the two of them together and I could’ve used a lot more Quan.
  • Khai is on the autism spectrum and I thought it came across as a pretty accurate portrayal. I liked watching his journey as he learned things about himself throughout the book. I enjoyed the chapters from his POV the most.

What didn’t work for Me

  • This is my fault more than the book’s, but I thought this was a Women’s Fiction book, but it’s straight up Romance. I was expecting something with a little more substance and a little less description of body parts and sex. It left me a little disappointed in the overall plot.
  • I had to continually remind myself that Esme was only 23. I know that she was coming to a new country and all and was naive in some things, but she wasn’t a wide-eyed innocent type of character, either. She just seemed so immature so much of the time and I found myself frustrated a lot by her interactions with Khai.
  • Speaking of her interactions with Khai, I wish that someone would have more fully explained Khai’s autism to Esme earlier in their relationship. So often she’s left frustrated and hurt after their interactions and had she understood him a little more, I felt she would have been able to respond in a more positive way and they could work out their issues together. There are a few times throughout the book that he’s able to explain something about himself and she adjusts how she approaches him and had she understood his autism earlier, they would have had way less issues. I’m not saying that there wouldn’t have been times she wasn’t frustrated or hurt, but I think it would have forced her to communicate her feelings and thoughts to him.
  • I felt like the pace was pretty slow and nothing really happened for long stretches of time. It took me quite awhile to really get into the story and to start caring about the romance between Esme and Khai. There were a few cute moments, but I never really fell in love with them.

Overall

Overall, The Bride Test was just ok for me. I liked the inclusion of Autism and Vietnamese culture, and loved the brotherly relationship between Khai and Quan, but Esme’s immaturity and the heavy Romance content left me a little underwhelmed. It’s not a book I would plan on reading again, but I think there will be a lot of people out there who will really enjoy it.

Overall Rating (out of 5): 3 Stars

Review: The Killer Across the Table by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker

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Synopsis from Goodreads:

The legendary FBI criminal profiler, number-one New York Times bestselling author, and inspiration for the hit Netflix show Mindhunter delves deep into the lives and crimes of four of the most disturbing and complex predatory killers, offering never-before-revealed details about his profiling process, and divulging the strategies used to crack some of America’s most challenging cases.

The FBI’s pioneer of criminal profiling, former special agent John Douglas, has studied and interviewed many of America’s most notorious killers—including  Charles Manson, ”Son of Sam Killer” David Berkowitz and ”BTK Strangler” Dennis Rader—trained FBI agents and investigators around and the world, and helped educate the country about these deadly predators and how they operate, and has become a legend in popular culture, fictionalized in The Silence of the Lambs and the hit television shows Criminal Minds and Mindhunter.

Twenty years after his famous memoir, the man who literally wrote the book on FBI criminal profiling opens his case files once again. In this riveting work of true crime, he spotlights four of the most diabolical criminals he’s confronted, interviewed and learned from. Going deep into each man’s life and crimes, he outlines the factors that led them to murder and how he used his interrogation skills to expose their means, motives, and true evil. Like the hit Netflix show, The Killer Across the Table is centered around Douglas’ unique interrogation and profiling process. With his longtime collaborator Mark Olshaker, Douglas recounts the chilling encounters with these four killers as he experienced them—revealing for the first time his profile methods in detail.

Going step by step through his interviews, Douglas explains how he connects each killer’s crimes to the specific conversation, and contrasts these encounters with those of other deadly criminals to show what he learns from each one. In the process, he returns to other famous cases, killers and interviews that have shaped his career, describing how the knowledge he gained from those exchanges helped prepare him for these.

A glimpse into the mind of a man who has pierced the heart of human darkness, The Killer Across the Table unlocks the ultimate mystery of depravity and the techniques and approaches that have countered evil in the name of justice.

I received a copy of this title from the Publisher. It does not impact my review.

The Killer Across the Table will be available May 7, 2019. 

I don’t often read Non-Fiction, but profiling has always fascinated me. Mindhunters has also been on my Watch List, so when I realized John Douglas is the inspiration for that show, I knew I had to read The Killer Across the Table.

John Douglas is a pioneer in profiling for the FBI. He and his colleague, Bob Ressler, started interviewing violent criminals to learn more about their motivations, which can ultimately help law enforcement in identifying, catching, and prosecuting the guilty. The book focuses on four different killers, ranging from a one-time (though horrific) offender to a serial killer. Included in each chapter is detailed background information about the subject, anecdotes of his interviews with other criminals that relate in some way to the current subject, details of the interview, and analysis of what it all means.

I found the book really interesting. It does not shy away from any of the gruesome facts, so it may not be for all readers. The four main subjects were Joe McGowan, Joseph Kondro, Donald Harvey, and Todd Kohlhepp. I had never heard of any of these men before picking up this book, but I will not soon forget the atrocities they committed. While the many anecdotes on previous cases were very interesting and added to the main case being discussed, it did get a little confusing at times with all the names and details being thrown around. There were also a few times where Douglas comes across pretty arrogant, mockingly dismissing the opinions of other professionals that he disagreed with. However, he is obviously very knowledgeable and dedicated to what he does, so I could look past the more arrogant moments.

Overall, I enjoyed The Killer Across the Table. I think profiling work is so interesting and I liked learning a little more about the process. I definitely recommend this one to true crime fans.

Overall Rating (out of 5): 4 Stars

April 2019 Recap

April was a pretty awful blogging month for me. I was out of commission for about a week because I got pretty sick, but I don’t really have much of an excuse for the rest of the month. April was not a great month for me, overall, actually. One bright spot was getting to visit my niece one weekend, though. Now she can walk and babble and she’s so fun. I really wish that they lived closer so I could see her more often.

Books Read: 10

Adult: 8
YA: 2

Favorite Book I Read This Month:

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Just One of the Groomsmen by Cindi Madsen and Past Perfect Life by Elizabeth Eulberg

  Books Reviewed: 3

The DNA of You and Me by Andrea Rothman – 1/5 Stars

Summer by the Tides by Denise Hunter – 4/5 Stars

Bridesmaids by Zara Stoneley – 4/5 Stars

Books Read in 2019 Overall: 48

Funny Fridays:

April 12

April 19

April 26

Other Posts:

March 2019 Recap

WWW Wednesday: April 10, 2019

WWW Wednesday: April 17, 2019

WWW Wednesday: April 24, 2019

Reviewing the Unreviewed: April 2019